hotkeybooks:

Vivian Versus America by Katie Coyle out in August 2014!
Click here to read our Design team’s story behind the cover…

UK readers! This is a thing you can buy in August, and it’s simply the prettiest.

hotkeybooks:

Vivian Versus America by Katie Coyle out in August 2014!

Click here to read our Design team’s story behind the cover…

UK readers! This is a thing you can buy in August, and it’s simply the prettiest.

rachelfershleiser:

"That was when I decided to take seriously the person I actually am rather than try to be a person whom others define as serious. Leaving academia to write fiction for children and teenagers was a return to that person I had been — the one who laughed easily, who liked makeup and baking and dance. I stopped being afraid of being thought silly or weak and instead pushed myself to be more than competent at the things I loved best to do. I am true now to what brings me joy and to what I do well — and most of the time, to hell with the rest."
(via E. Lockhart on embracing the young adult inside her - latimes.com)

rachelfershleiser:

"That was when I decided to take seriously the person I actually am rather than try to be a person whom others define as serious. Leaving academia to write fiction for children and teenagers was a return to that person I had been — the one who laughed easily, who liked makeup and baking and dance. I stopped being afraid of being thought silly or weak and instead pushed myself to be more than competent at the things I loved best to do. I am true now to what brings me joy and to what I do well — and most of the time, to hell with the rest."

(via E. Lockhart on embracing the young adult inside her - latimes.com)

When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.
Anthony Mackie (via rexilla)

(via amywhipple)

fuckyespetercapaldi:

If you’ll excuse me I have some serious crying to do.

Did you know that when you send Peter Capaldi fan mail he sends you back adorable original artwork? I know this, because I follow no less than five Peter Capaldi fan tumblrs (not because I’ve done it [yet]!). Anyway, what a great guy. I definitely feel a normal amount of appreciation and interest in his career, accent, and face. Nobody would look at my Google search history and say, “…Katie, what the hell.”

fuckyespetercapaldi:

If you’ll excuse me I have some serious crying to do.

Did you know that when you send Peter Capaldi fan mail he sends you back adorable original artwork? I know this, because I follow no less than five Peter Capaldi fan tumblrs (not because I’ve done it [yet]!). Anyway, what a great guy. I definitely feel a normal amount of appreciation and interest in his career, accent, and face. Nobody would look at my Google search history and say, “…Katie, what the hell.”

When you talk [in interviews] about the shows that have been especially important to you, you always mention BuffyMy So-Called Life, and Freaks and Geeks. Do you think there’s anything to be said about the fact that these are all teen shows, or at least shows about teenagers?

Yes! I actually have this theory that I’ve never written up: that teenage girls and middle-aged men are the source of the best modern television. They’re both emotionally labile figures going through a period of identity formation. They’re angry and horny and they bridle at the dullness of social conformity. They’re unnerved by the way their bodies are changing. They feel like the world is ending.

Those two iconic figures both been the central characters in a lot of the best shows—the cable masculinity dramas (The SopranosThe WireDeadwood,Breaking Bad) and the shows you mention, which are less often considered key to the Golden Age of TV [in the late ’90s]. But they should be, both because these shows are wonderful and because they were stealthily revolutionary, modeling all sorts of important things: They mixed comedy and drama with a free hand; they treated family and romantic drama with sophistication (rather than melodrama or sentimentality); and, just in general, they were shows that managed to be humane without being sappy. Two of them also only lasted one season, in an only-the-good-die-young sort of way, so it seems particularly important to bring them up, so they don’t disappear.

Although some of this is just personal taste, and yes, for whatever reason, I’ve always liked smart teen stuff.

From Why Can’t I Be You: Emily Nussbaum, over at Rookie. Emily Nussbaum is currently one of my top five favorite people with opinions, and I love this interview with her, especially this part, for obvious reasons.

seraphica:

Harry Potter Tribute Exhibition [x]

Getting lovely Mary Blair vibes from all this. Also, weeping.

(via quitelikearthurdent)

ATTN: SAN FRANCISCO WRITERS

I belong to a truly wonderful writing group that meets every Tuesday evening in the Mission, in homes or bars, to workshop fiction or non-fiction or poetry or whatever it is you’re working on, but also just to drink wine and discuss the books we’re reading and, often, for long intervals, television. We are seeking one to two new members to join our ranks. Does this sound like the sort of thing that would interest you? If so, message me!

(Source: vintagebutt, via tardisandthethief)

Caity: A magic, quasi-old train is basically everyone’s childhood dream, right? Imagine if Harry Potter had pulled up to Hogwarts in an airport taxi. That trip is like two hours, door-to-door if you fly. A protracted, scenic train ride lends a dreamy tone to any kids’ story.

Rich: You need time to think about how different you are from the other children.

The Best Restaurant in New York

What I Read This Month: March 2014

  • If You’re Not Yet Like Me, Edan Lepucki. This is not a humble brag so much as an out-and-out boast, but I have dined (multiple times!) with Edan, and yet I had not until this month read this, her novella (her debut novel, California, comes out in July!), because in a lot of ways I am lazy and terrible. Anyway, I finally did and I am so happy. One of the best things that can happen is that a hilarious, smart, delightful person you know in real life writes a book just as hilarious, smart, and delightful as that person. Reader, I fucking loved it. 
  • It’s Complicted #1. Does anyone know if this project is still happening because it is wonderful.
  • The Goldfinch, Donna Tartt. Beautiful writing and hard to put down, but I think I look to be warmly enveloped by a book of this size and scope, and Tartt always feels like she’s working hard not to let me love anybody. Also—maybe I’m crazy—but I think a couple of sentences could have been cut here or there. Maybe from one of the many multi-page descriptions of furniture?
  • Short stories: “The Remains,” Laura Spence-Ash; “ReMem,” Amy Brill; and my favorite, “Phenomenon,” by Julie Buntin. SMART GIRLS AND STARS AND DANCING GHOST BEARS.
  • Home Cooking, Laurie Colwin, & Stock Tips, edited by Rachel Fershleiser and Ami Greko. I put these together because they’re both warm, inspiring ruminations on a theme I’ve lately become obsessed with: the joys of feeding yourself and others. Plus recipes!
  • Be Safe I Love You, Cara Hoffman. I am, you might remember, a huge fan of Hoffman’s debut novel So Much Pretty, so I was very excited to get my hands on her second, on shelves TOMORROW. I love the sister-brother relationship at the center of the plot, and I especially love the way Hoffman manages to tackle Issues without losing warmth, narrative drive, and focus. Both this and So Much Pretty are books about what happens when remarkable girls find themselves unable to overcome ancient ideological structures, and (aside from this list) that’s pretty much all I ever want to read.
  • Drinking Coffee Elsewhere, Z.Z. Packer. These stories did not totally wow me.